Techabal's newsletter skipped this analysis so I resurrected my newsletter


#1

A recent edition of Techcabal’s newsletter covered the announcement of a $6.6 million funding round for an African health tech start-up. In comparison to @SkweiRd’s usually excellent analysis, he didn’t do this landmark event justice. A ‘solid path from zero to one’ was his take. I realized health tech is in danger of becoming the overlooked area of the African tech world.

I’m now recommitting to my newsletter for Digital Health Nigeria. I will do one at least monthly and attempt to give some analysis and nuance into what’s going on in the health tech industry. It’ll be hard work so please help by reading, sharing and providing feedback. African health tech deserves to be better documented. This is my small contribution.

Read and subscribe to the newsletter here

Also thanks to @spokentwice who recently wrote about newsletters. It gave me some ginger to recommit.


#2

Happy to hear.

Hopefully, your newsletter becomes the go-to place for everything health tech in Nigeria and you can become the “gatekeeper” for your entire industry’s innovation updates.

That’s a powerful position to be in (it can become your social capital)


#3

This is great news!

I admitted in the same edition that I have had limited exposure to the company/sector, which is why I tried to be measured with my analysis. I try to remain mute about issues that I do not yet have a strong grasp of, so that I do not do more harm than good. That this was so obvious to you is a direct result of your domain expertise.

As you will find out soon [even more than you think], it is much harder than it seems, to keep it up for a long time, especially if yours has a publishing cadence as frequent as mine [daily!].

Meanwhile, I am rethinking the product, and might be turning it into a daily column, as opposed to “TechCabal’s newsletter”, and your Digital Health newsletter might benefit from TC’s distribution/structure if we treat it as a monthly column. Sound good? Email osarumen@bigcabal.com and copy staylor@bigcabal.com.

In the meantime, I will feature this first issue in the newsletter tomorrow. Should help drive awareness for it.

Cheers,


#4

I read and subscribed…enjoyed it too!


#5

Possibly shameless plug.

There is a need for newsletters that discuss niche relevant issues; for hardware we publish Hardware Things every month.


#6

Actually, this is really good! And nice touch to send out your newsletter on the 1st of he month. BTW, what happened to the Hardware winners?


#7

There were some disagreements within the founders on the future of the company and then they ran out of money.

[Clicking the picture would have led you to the thread here, apologies that it wasn’t intuitive.]


#8

Thanks @ideadibia just read it. Shame about the outcome.

At the risk that we’re hijacking this thread (hope @docneto doesn’t mind too much), do the hardware startups in Nigeria actually build their hardware in-house? Or is it a case of prototype, then off to China for actual production?


#9

Apologies again, @docneto

@PapaOlabode That is a loaded question, and it is really on a case-by-case basis.

Some startups develop their products completely in house, with components sourced either locally or abroad. These startups typically sell directly to their customers and the look and feel may not matter a lot, examples of such products are inverters.

Some startups prototype and get manufacturing runs from China. Typically, these are selling to a different clientele and as such the look and feel of the final product matters more. An example is VNTS.

Note should be taken also that there are local places to actually manufacture a product: Microscale Embedded can manufacture excellent printed circuit boards (and as well as doing contract manufacturing work, produce their products completely in house), and Tranos just got an Injection Molding Machine, Webber has a Plasma Cutting Machine and can do very intricate enclosures.

At the end of the day, it’s mostly a cost for quality vs capacity and IP issue that determines how startups produce IMO.


#10

Thanks @SkweiRd would be great to contribute a monthly piece covering health tech and gain from your structure. I’ll send an email.

I can only imagine how hard doing the daily newsletter is. I hope you persist as all your readers value it immensely.


#11

Thanks a lot @PapaOlabode for reading and y’all are welcome to continue to discuss @ideadibia. On a related note @PapaOlabode I’ve been meaning to attend BTNG as I’m close enough to London but I continue to put it on the long finger. Perhaps the next one whenever it is.


#12

Actually, we had a Christmas party last Friday. It was really good (if I say so myself :grinning:). I’m sure a post and pictures will be available sometime next week. In regards to the ‘next one’ there’s talk of sharing proposed dates for next year’s events. Hopefully, that makes it easier for you to attend one. Cheers


#13

Subscribed. My comments to @docneto about a potential column/newsletter w/ TC applies here, by the way. Might have to make some changes to the product structure [mostly depth], but the invitation is wide open. Send an email if you are interested.


#14

Hey @docneto recap with pictures below:

https://medium.com/btng-uk/bntg-christmas-party-recap-pictures-72d2193f0ecc?


#15

Sent out another edition of our digital health newsletter. Read it here.

Features some analysis on the Angolan health system, A.I for birth asphyxia and, telemedicine.

We’re also starting a crowd sourced solution for in hospital cardiac arrests and are looking for more collaborators. DM me if you’re interested.